The Synergy Between Theory and Practice in Cryptography

04.03.2019 16:00-16:50

The Synergy Between Theory and Practice in Cryptography

04.03.2019, 16:00 – 16:50

Speaker: Jean Paul Degabriele, PhD | Location: Hochschulstraße 10 (S2|02), Piloty Building, Room C120, Darmstadt

Organizer: Fachbereich Informatik

Abstract
In this talk I will try to give a flavour of my line of research by surveying some of my works. It will touch upon topics such as IPsec, EMV, SSH, security models, and Tor. An overarching theme of my research is to bring cryptographic theory and practice closer to each other. I will give examples of how cryptographic practice fails because it is not informed by theory. On the other hand, we will also see how cryptographic schemes with security proofs can still succumb to practical attacks because our security models do not reflect practical settings accurately enough. I will discuss how my research tries to amend these issues and conclude with an overview of future research directions.


Short bio
Jean Paul obtained his PhD in Information Security in 2014 from Royal Holloway and later held postdoctoral positions at TU Darmstadt, Royal Holloway, and the University of Maryland. Prior to that, he worked at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories in Bristol and in the banking sector in Greece. He is originally from Malta, where he grew up and graduated in Electrical Engineering.

Jean Paul's research interests range between applied cryptography and network security. In the past he has worked on the security analysis of protocols like IPsec, EMV, SSH, and Tor, bringing security models closer to practice, symmetric cryptography, and securing cryptography against mass surveillance. His co-authored paper 'A Surfeit of SSH Cipher Suites' was the recipient of a Best Paper Award at ACM CCS 2016. As part of his fellowship, he intends to pursue research on security technologies that help preserve privacy and freedom over the Internet. In addition, he is also interested in cryptographic schemes that protect against side channels and the use of randomness in cryptography.

zur Liste